Showing posts with label art. Show all posts
Showing posts with label art. Show all posts

Thursday, February 18, 2016

Spring News!

My blog posts are anything but frequent!  In fact my entire art-making has taken a back seat to, well, the rest of my life!  The irony of this slip in my online presence is that between my work for the clients of my own company, Chicago Social Media Marketers, and my relatively new position as the Marketing Manager for Northshore Concert Band in Evanston, Illinois, I have been focusing on the promotion of everyone and everything BUT myself and my own art work!

Well, I am here to say that I am back...for now!  I will move forward with the best of intentions to post in a more regular fashion!  But, as any resolution, this goal may not be met and my conviction to consistently post to this blog may be short-lived.  Only time will tell!!

Exciting News!
Two publication announcements!


Surface Design Journal
The Tactile World
Winter 2015-2016

Towards the end of 2015, I was contacted by Miles Conrad, director of the Conrad Wilde Gallery in Tucson, Arizona.  He was writing an article for Surface Design Journal and wanted to include my work. I have shown at this wonderful gallery in 2012 for their Seventh Annual Encaustic Invitational and the following year for their Eighth Annual Encaustic Invitational.  The Surface Design Journal is one of the most prestigious publications on textiles in the world. I was thrilled that Miles wanted to include my work in this, one of my favorite publications!  I sent Miles images of a number of my sculptures and he chose The Power of Place.



While I still have not received a copy of this issue, Milisa Galazzi, another artist included in this article, posted page images online.  I am honored to be included with Milisa and these other amazing artists: Jennie Frederick, Lorrie Fredette, Cari Hernandez, Jane Nodine and Daniella Woolf.









ARTSLANT
Under the Radar
Artist Profile
January 15, 2016 

I was excited to receive an email from Amaru Rodríguez Aguilar of ArtSlant, the premier online art network, informing me that they would be featuring my artist profile in their Under the Radar feature. This feature, which is included in their weekly mailing and appears on their website's homepage, is curated by their senior editors.



Wednesday, February 10, 2016

2016 Art Exhibitions


I am so very happy to announce that I have a number of exciting opportunities to show my art in 2016!


February 26 - March 31, 2016
4th Annual Art Competition
Bridgeport Art Center
Chicago, Illinois

Persistence of Vision

April 2- May 21, 2016
11th Annual Encaustic Invitational: Length x Width x Depth
Conrad Wilde Gallery
Tucson, Arizona

The Power of Place

May 1- June 31, 2016
The Dot Show
Chicago Arts District showPODS
1822-43 S. Halsted Street
Chicago, Illinois

Detail, Flow

October 10-November 20, 2016
Solo
Space and Surface:  Sculpture and Paintings by Alicia Forestall-Boehm
Western Illinois University Art Gallery
Macomb, Illinois
  
Spaces We Inhabit, Art Space Vincennes


Sunday, March 22, 2015

Art Exhibition Themes

Setting up an art exhibition quite often begins by choosing a theme.  A theme can serve to tie all of the included works together.  It usually explores a particular concept or idea.  



I am a member of the artists group FUSEDChicago.  For our first group show of the year, Textual Encounters at ARC Gallery in Chicago, we exhibited works that are inspired by the written word.  My textural reference was a quote from the artist Jasper Johns:  “One likes to think that one anticipates changes in the spaces we inhabit, and our ideas about space.”

For this exhibit I wanted to include some of the columns from my sculpture "Spaces We Inhabit".  These 15 feet high sculptures were designed to be hung from the ceiling, enabling visitors to walk among them but I was unable to do so in this space.  So I adapted and installed 7 of the columns with this wall hanger.
 

 
"Spaces We Inhabit", ARC Gallery

I have been in art exhibitions that use an art medium as a means to tie the work together.  Big Bad Wax at the Mount Dora Center for the Arts in Mount Dora, Florida was a juried exhibit of works by 36 nationally acclaimed artists that incorporated the medium of wax.

My sculpture "Place" hanging on the wall at the Mount Dora Center for the Arts

Some exhibitions are created through a collaborative effort.  University galleries work with an academic department to create an interesting and educational exhibit.

 
"Vessel 24", Koehnline Art Museum


Call and Response: From Artemisia to Frida at the Koehnline Museum of Art in Des Plaines, Illinois was created in collaboration with the Oakton Community College's Women's and Gender Studies Program.  This juried art exhibit included artwork by "prominent lacal and naitional women artists...that respond in ways that honor, critique or expand upon techniques and content of groundbreaking female "master" - past and present."  My encaustic and fiber vessel series paid homage to Dat So La Lee, a renowned American Indian basket weaver.

"Passages", Swope Art Museum

Many art organizations include an annual art exhibit in their exhibition calendar.   The Swope Art Museum in Terre Haute, Indiana has had an annual juried exhibition for 70 years.  This annual event includes the work of artists from Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Kentucky and Ohio.


 

Saturday, August 23, 2014

The Evolution of a Sculpture



I often begin a new work from a sketched design.  The lower design in this image from my sketch book was the inspiration for a new sculpture.




Beginning with a circular wire support, I created a 3 dimensional version of this sketched image.  The problem was that, to me, the actual sculpture didn't please me as much as the sketched image.  So it sat in the back of my studio waiting for a creative revelation. 





Then one day, as I studied this piece, I envisioned it "exploding" open, so I took an  knife to it and, leaving the circular wire armature intact, turned the single form into one that had five connecting sections.  This  alteration added interest and movement.  Hmmm, this certainly was a dramatic departure from the original sketch but it was a move in the right direction.



Knowing that this piece was not finished, I returned it to it's spot in the back of my studio.  I lived with this new form, manipulating these five appendages in many different  ways until I was sure that this wasn't what I ultimately wanted either!!  This time I got out the wire cutters and separated the sections from each other.


Persistence of Vision, 24"x24"x3"


After working with each section on it's own, I ultimately created a wall hung sculpture that consisted of 5 individual and unique works.  Persistence of Vision really was a deviation from the form I originally sketched!