Showing posts with label sculpture. Show all posts
Showing posts with label sculpture. Show all posts

Friday, January 16, 2015

Transformed Spaces

I was thrilled to have had the opportunity for my first solo exhibition this past December.

My show Transformed Spaces consisted of two sculptural installations; Infinite Possibilities and The Spaces We Inhabit.  It considered the symmetry of the urban landscape and explored the physical and mental boundaries of the public and private spaces we inhabit.  

 Infinite Possibilities is a wall installation consisting of 30 unique wall cubes, each utilizing similar and familiar materials yet each recognizing its own distinctive space.  Spaces We Inhabit is an installation of a dozen, twelve foot high columns of encaustic and fiber sculptures created by altering 2-dimensional paintings.  This transformation acknowledges another kind of space; one of visual repetitiveness and change. 

Transformed Spaces was installed in the Art on Armitage Gallery window December 1, 2015 and was up throughout the month.  I was lucky enough to have the assistance of my husband Doug.  He did all of the ladder work, installing the ceiling hooks which held the sculptural columns. 

I had laid out the cubes of the wall installation Infinite Possibilities days earlier in my studio but found that once I was at Art on Armitage,  I ended up playing around with the final layout which involved popping outside a number of times in order to get the over all feeling of the piece. 


ART ON ARMITAGE is a window gallery in Chicago that brings art out of the confines of the traditional art gallery and into the realm of the public.

Many thanks to all of you who were able to see my show and thank you to Mary Ellen Croteau at Art on Armitage for this opportunity.  

Saturday, August 23, 2014

The Evolution of a Sculpture

I often begin a new work from a sketched design.  The lower design in this image from my sketch book was the inspiration for a new sculpture.

Beginning with a circular wire support, I created a 3 dimensional version of this sketched image.  The problem was that, to me, the actual sculpture didn't please me as much as the sketched image.  So it sat in the back of my studio waiting for a creative revelation. 

Then one day, as I studied this piece, I envisioned it "exploding" open, so I took an  knife to it and, leaving the circular wire armature intact, turned the single form into one that had five connecting sections.  This  alteration added interest and movement.  Hmmm, this certainly was a dramatic departure from the original sketch but it was a move in the right direction.

Knowing that this piece was not finished, I returned it to it's spot in the back of my studio.  I lived with this new form, manipulating these five appendages in many different  ways until I was sure that this wasn't what I ultimately wanted either!!  This time I got out the wire cutters and separated the sections from each other.

Persistence of Vision, 24"x24"x3"

After working with each section on it's own, I ultimately created a wall hung sculpture that consisted of 5 individual and unique works.  Persistence of Vision really was a deviation from the form I originally sketched!

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Summer Exhibition

With much of my time spent creating new works, I have expended little energy on submitting to summer exhibitions.  The Swope Art Museum in Terre Haute, Indiana has had an annual exhibition for the past 69 years.  The 70th Annual Wabash Valley Juried Exhibition includes the work of artists residing in Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Michigan, and Ohio.


This year's exhibition was jurored by Carter E. Foster, the Steven and Ann Ames Curator of Drawings at the Whitney Museum of American Art.  The opportunity to position my work in front of this jurors eyes was all the motivation I needed to find the time to submit to this show.

Unfulfilled Dream

I entered three encaustic and fiber sculptures;
"Unfulfilled Dream", "Passages" and "Living Together-But-Separate Lives".
The first two were chosen and included in this exhibition. 

Living Together-But-Separate Lives

The exhibition runs from June 28-August 23, 2014.

Swope Art Museum

Sunday, June 8, 2014

Spaces We Inhabit part two

In my last post I talked about my preparation for the exhibit "Spaces We Inhabit" and the two sculptural installations I created for this show.  This post is a collection of images from the exhibition.  

"Spaces We Inhabit" at the Hairpin Arts Center, Chicago.

Me with my installation Spaces We Inhabit.  It consisted of 7 ceiling-hung columns, each 15' long.  The cubes themselves vary in size from 1.5"x1.5"x1.5" to 4.5"x4.5"x4.5".

Infinite Possibilities on the wall to the left.  The Power of Place and Make No Little Plans on pedestals.  On the wall - two paintings by Mary Zeran between two paintings by Emily Rutledge.

Moving Day on the wall to the left, Place on the pedestal, paintings by Emily Rutledge on the wall and a peek of my installation Spaces We Inhabit between the wall and column.

Emily Rutledge (left) and Mary Zeran.

The 7 columns of Spaces We Inhabit .

A detail shot of Spaces We Inhabit.

This side of the display walls are viewable from the street and include three paintings in the foreground by Emily Rutledge and a painting by Mary Zeran.  Two columns of Spaces We Inhabit are visible at the end.

Make No Little Plans on the pedestal and Infinite Possibilities on the wall in the background.

The artists of "Spaces We Inhabit" - myself, Mary Zeran and Emily Rutledge.

Four of my sculptures were displayed on pedestals.



     The Power of Place

Make No Little Plans

Tuesday, May 6, 2014

Spaces We Inhabit

Back in November of 2013, artists Mary Zeran and Emily Rutledge approached me with the idea of putting together a proposal for an exhibition of our work.  What evolved was “Spaces We Inhabit: Sculptures and Paintings by Alicia Forestall-Boehm, Emily Rutledge and Mary Zeran” at the Hairpin Arts Center in Chicago.  I was familiar with Hairpin having exhibited my encaustic and fiber Vessels in the center’s inaugural exhibition “Come Together”.  
Vessel 12, Vessel 14, Vessel 20 on shelves to the right.
Mary Ellen Croteau's work to the left
Come Together, Hairpin Arts Center
It is a beautiful light-filled windowed space situated in a historical building in Chicago’s Logan Square neighborhood. In my last blog post "Winter Exhibition News" I mused about turning a new wall hanging sculpture, “Place”, into a multi-piece installation.
100+ feet of cotton rope for my ceiling hung sculpture, Spaces We Inhabit

My vision of the a multi-columned hanging sculpture was just the challenging project that would amply fill the long cold Chicago winter days.  And this is how my ceiling hung installation “Spaces We Inhabit”, named after the exhibit that inspired its creation, came to be.  In addition, I wanted to create a wall installation of 25 unique cubes.  Each cube began with a 3.5”x3.5”3.5” wooden cube form.  The materials for the cubes ranged from encaustic to fiber to paper, twine and wire. 
Cubes, in progress, for Infinite Possibilities
I entitled this work “Infinite Possibilities” as each cubes’ unique design stemmed from paintings and sculpture that I had made in the past.  The small size of my studio, which would likely be described as “cozy” in the real estate world, slowly shrank as each column and cube was completed. 
Pile of columns!
Detail of columns of
Places We Inhabit
As the drop off date for the exhibition approached I began to ask myself if I had bitten off more than I could chew with the decision to create two new large-scale sculptural installation works!  My initial plan to create 7, 15” columns was achieved but “Infinite Possibilities” shrank to 15 cubes.  While the final number of cubes made my plan of a grid-design impossible, I was very happy with the resulting asymmetrical installation.

“Spaces We Inhabit: Sculptures and Paintings by Alicia Forestall-Boehm, Emily Rutledge and Mary Zeran” at the Hairpin Arts Center, Logan Square, Chicago.  May 9-June 8, 2014
 Opening Reception: Friday, May 9th, 6-9pm

Monday, December 2, 2013

Winter Exhibition News

Place (detail)
I’m sending two of my newest sculptures to Florida this month.  I am especially pleased that both were accepted as it was the first time I had submitted either for an exhibition.  Place is the largest work I have created to date, measuring 6’7”, twice that if it is laid out from end to end.  I plan to pursue Place as a series that will be hung as a multi-piece installation.


 encaustic, cheesecloth, cotton cord, foam  

Passages has been a work in progress.  I made the base last year and it sat off to the side in my studio waiting for inspiration.  Over time this base changed shape until I came upon the decidedly boat-like form it is today.  It then returned again to that “place of contemplation” off to the side in my studio until one day I spied the roll of copper wire I had in a container of wire and cords.  I really like the combination of metal with wax and fiber.  The small sections of copper wire impale the smooth waxed surface of the form bringing a menacing sense to this simple, still and serene form.  This certainly might be my love-hate relationship with water coming out.  Nothing would make me happier than to sit on the porch of a beach house looking and listening to the ocean all day but you would be hard pressed to get me in that same water.
Passages (detail)
Place and Passages are both included in "Big Bad Wax" at the Mount Dora Center for the Arts in Mount Dora, Florida.  This national juried encaustic exhibition was juried by Kim Bernard and Susan Loden.  This exhibition runs January 10 – March 2, 2014.  The opening reception is January 10, 2014, 6-8pm. 

encaustic, cheesecloth, copper wire

As many of you know, I am a member of FUSEDChicago, a group of Chicago area artists using the encaustic medium.   One of our missions is to advance public awareness of encaustic art through exhibitions of member work.   This is a group of extremely talented artists and so the many group exhibitions that have been held have been truly excellent events.
               Make No Little Plans    
9”x9” cube
encaustic, cheesecloth on wood panels  

I am happy that Make No Little Plans is included in the next FUSEDChicago group exhibition, “Fused” held at the Union Street Gallery in Chicago Heights, Illinois.  The show is curated by  Jessica Segal and will run from January 15 – February 8, 2014.  The opening reception is January 17, 2014.

Holiday wishes to everyone and many thanks for your support!


Thursday, October 31, 2013

Fall Exhibition News



                                                   Vertical Lines                                                                       15”hx15”wx8”d                  

Encaustic, Cheesecloth hand dyed by artist, Hemp cord, Wire, Found metal   


[v. in-vahyt; n. in-vahyt]    verb, in·vit·ed, in·vit·ing, noun
verb (used with object)
1. to request the presence or participation of in a kindly, courteous, or complimentary way, especially to request to come or go to some place, gathering, entertainment, etc., or to do something.

                                                      Unfulfilled Dream                                                        6"hx32"wx7"d

Encaustic, Cheesecloth hand dyed by artist, Hemp cord, Wire, Found metal
It is always nice to receive an invitation.  Although, today it is usually in the form of an evite, non-the-less it is always nice to be asked. 

As an artist, it is especially nice to be asked to participate in an exhibition.  I was very happy to receive such an invitation last month from Beate Minkovski, the director for Woman Made Gallery in Chicago.  The jurors for the upcoming exhibiton. From the Earth, Mary Stoppert and Carmen Perez have invited me to exhibit three of my sculptures; Vertical Lines, Unfulfilled Dream and Coming Together.

Coming Together


Encaustic, Cheesecloth, Wire

This will be my first exhibition at Woman Made Gallery.  From the Earth runs from November 15 to December 22, 2013.  The opening reception is November 15, 2013, 6-9pm. 

Woman Made Gallery
685 N. Milwaukee Ave.
Chicago, IL 60642


Tuesday, October 8, 2013


The Power of Place
encaustic, fiber, hemp cord, wire 
Inspiration can come from anywhere.  As an artist, I am inspired by the urban landscape. I am drawn to the innate sense of randomness, clutter and change that can define an urban existence.   The landscape of the city and its architecture can seem unwelcoming with its hard edges and its overflow of inhabitants.  In actuality, there is an inherent harmony that exists in a city.  The visual repetitiveness and symmetry of the buildings themselves to the city plans they fill. The cacophonies of sounds that can, with their aspect of constancy, make for a soothing element of dependability.  And while certainly, there is a certain discordant relationship among some city dwellers, there is a remarkable interchange of order among the majority of inhabitants.  I am also inspired by those people, whose visions helped to create this world. 


The Power of Place
My latest sculpture, The Power of Place, was inspired by Richard Serra.  This remarkable artist is known for his large-scale, minimalistic sculptures that invite the exchange between the viewer, the site and the piece itself.  His large steel works are often site-specific and are designed to dwarf the viewer.  I am drawn to his work as it often has a feeling of flowing movement and is always complex in its simplicity. With my own sculptures, I try to pare down basic elements of color, shape and movement into elegant simplified forms.  I explore the right angled urban world and how people live in this environment.  How they interact with the spaces, the architecture and with each other.   Serra has said that his sculptures create new spaces within existing spaces which makes me associate a level of architectural design to his work.  While encountering his work, walking around it and through it, you are forced to acknowledge the space around you which often includes the people around you who are sharing this experience.
The Power of Place


Two interesting videos on Richard Serra installations at MoMA: